Simple mistake, or panic time?

I got an unsettling call from the election commission this morning, informing me that Nashville had issued a report stating that Alpha’s social security number was previously assigned to someone in Shelby County.

After double-checking that the number Anderson County has on file is the same as on our last several years’ tax returns,, as well as Alpha’s tax returns, and on her card, the nice lady from the election commission went downstairs to the Department of Safety to check and see what number they had on file for Alpha on her driver’s license.  It was the same.  Knowing that she had to show her social security card to get her license, the election commission is now satisfied that Alpha’s number is correct.

The fellow in Shelby County’s license is revoked, so he’s theoretically not driving on it… but her social security number is evidently the one attached to his revoked license.

The Social Security Administration was most unhelpful; they’ll only change the number if it’s a life-or-death stalking situation.  They’re not interested in any report of someone using her number fraudulently. 

There are a couple of possibilities: one, that this guy mis-remembers his number, and the folks in Shelby County just aren’t diligent about asking to see the actual card, or, two, that this stems from personal information (tax returns, bank statements, etc.) that may have been taken in our burglary a couple of years ago — the house was so trashed and files strewn all over, it’s hard to know what was missing and what wasn’t.  Maybe it’s just one digit off or something… I don’t know.

Either way, it’s a pretty scary problem.  I’ll have her pull copies of her credit reports (which should be absolutely blank, except for the existence of a bank account).  Assuming those are okay, we’ll file a fraud report with the FTC and put in an alert with the credit reporting agencies, just to be safe.
*   *   *   *   *
I’ve always been very protective of the kids’ social security numbers; the school requires them at enrollment, but on the forms that come home each year, I simply write "on file" in that blank.  I had them check the "do not show" box for their social security numbers on their driver’s licenses, because it’s really not necessary for every store clerk taking a check to see that number.  Besides, kids lose purses and wallets, so it’s one more way to guard against identity theft.

In spite of all that, there’s still a problem.  Any other suggestions would be most welcome.

4 Responses to “Simple mistake, or panic time?”

  1. on 17 Sep 2007 at 11:59 am LissaKay

    SSA should be able to give you her earnings report … which would show if someone else had been employed using her SSN. This is the most common use of stolen SSNs, for illegals to use so they can work. That the SSA seems uninterested in this seems unusual. I would kick it up a notch, it most definitely IS their business if SSNs are being used improperly.

  2. on 17 Sep 2007 at 12:19 pm Netmom

    Thanks, Lissa. I hadn’t thought of that, but I’ve now requested a copy. Brook Thompson, the State Elections Coordinator, was most helpful — he’s going to ensure that the Shelby Co. record is purged.

    Now, if only the Dept. of Safety can come through as well — I’m waiting on a callback from them now. She’s requesting her credit reports today; I just hope there’s no problem there to deal with.

  3. on 17 Sep 2007 at 2:24 pm AT

    Calling the three big credit reporting agencies and putting a hold on anything requiring a credit report may be a good idea.


  4. […] Snooper wrote an interesting post today onHere’s a quick excerptI got an unsettling call from the election commission this morning, informing me that Nashville had issued a report stating that Alpha’s social security number was previously assigned to someone in Shelby County. … […]

Trackback this Post | Feed on comments to this Post

Leave a Reply